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Violence against women starts with disrespect

Violence can take many different forms, including physical and non-physical, and we may not always recognise it. Being aware of the different ways that violence and abuse is used helps us to better understand it, talk about it, and reject it.

Coercive control, emotional and economical abuse, and harassment through technology, are all ways of perpetrating violence which can often be used alongside, or lead to, physical violence. It can also exist in different types of relationships, whether that be with an intimate partner, ex-partner, or between family members.

We know rates of violence increase for some women when other forms of discrimination exist. Gender-based violence disproportionately impacts Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women, culturally, ethnically, religiously and linguistically diverse women, migrant and refugee women, women with disability and LGBTIQA+ and gender diverse people.

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  • Violence against women is at epidemic proportions in Australia. In 2022-23, 1 woman was killed every 11 days by their current or former intimate partner1 in Australia.

     

    Since the age of 152:  

    • 1 in 4 women have experienced violence by an intimate partner; compared to 1 in 14 men. 
    • 1 in 11 women have experienced violence by a boyfriend, girlfriend, or date, compared to 1 in 44 men.  
    • 1 in 4 women experienced partner emotional abuse, compared to 1 in 7 men. 
    • 1 in 12 women have experienced violence by a family member since the age of 15, compared to 1 in 17 men.

     

    Violence can take many different forms, including physical and non-physical, and we may not always recognise it. Being aware of the different ways that violence and abuse is used helps us to better understand it, talk about it, and reject it.

     

    Coercive control, emotional and economical abuse, and harassment through technology, are all ways of perpetrating violence which can often be used alongside, or lead to, physical violence. Violence can also exist in different types of relationships, whether that be with an intimate partner, or ex-partner, or between family members.

     

    We know that rates of violence increase for some women when other forms of discrimination exist. Gender-based violence disproportionately impacts Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women, culturally, ethnically, religiously and linguistically diverse women, migrant and refugee women, women with disability and LGBTIQA+ and gender diverse people.

     

    Violence against women and all gender-based violence has long-term and far-reaching impacts. It affects children, families, friends, work colleagues, communities and society as a whole. It will take all of us to play an active role to prevent and end it.